My mobile-first journalism presentation and other highlights from the 2016 J/i Conference

I found my people in February in Gainesville. They were the speakers and guests at the Journalism Interactive Conference at the University of Florida, where I hosted a session about mobile news.

Anyone who’s been to a journalism conference knows these things can be hit or miss. The session about monetization turns out to be some guy talking about why his newspaper is the special exception to the downward spiral of ad revenue. The social media workshop is run by some newsroom’s intern whose presentation is all fluff and no strategy.

I learned a lot at J/i, but I also had some very interesting conversations with journalists and journalism instructors doing important, innovative work. I don’t love talking about journalism and journalists; I’d much rather do it and teach it. J/i was full of people just like that who were there to talk about what they’re trying and figure out how to incorporate one another’s successes into their newsrooms and classrooms. Continue reading My mobile-first journalism presentation and other highlights from the 2016 J/i Conference

What happened when I let my students Google me

 

In addition to the Multimedia Storytelling class I’ve been teaching for a few years at Temple University, this semester I’m also teaching Journalism Research.

Students in this required course, mostly sophomores, learn how to use various databases, library tools  and social media to research and verify information, and then determine how to use that information in their reporting.

I gave them a pretty simple assignment for our very first class: Google me and tell me what you find. The idea here was to measure the baseline of their search skills – what are they checking, where does that lead them, and how deep will they dive?

The results are below. Continue reading What happened when I let my students Google me

How to explain your social media job

social iconsI was recently invited to speak to students in a social media innovations class at Temple University.

I’ve been doing social media professionally for about five years, but I still haven’t found the best way to explain to people what it is I really do and how I do it. It became clear to me during this class why that is.

Though I work closely with the marketing and membership departments at WHYY, most of the social media work I do is concentrated in the newsroom. And the social media I use with my journalism students is also news-based. It wasn’t until I found myself talking directly with students whose career paths are more business-oriented and product-based that I fully realized why it’s so hard to explain social media positions.

“You pretty much can’t teach anything these days without incorporating social media.”

Bingo. That was on one of the (rather boring-looking) slides I brought with me to the class. Everyone uses social media, and because there’s no one clear purpose for it, there’s no quick explanation for how to use it. Continue reading How to explain your social media job

What my multimedia journalism students will learn this semester

Our classroom at Temple University's Center City Campus
Our classroom at Temple University’s Center City Campus

The Spring 2014 semester at Temple University starts today (we’re delayed a week because of snow and ice), and as of 5:30 p.m., I’ll be back in the classroom with junior and senior journalism undergrads. We’ve got 15 weeks to explore multimedia storytelling. Here’s some of what we’ll do: Continue reading What my multimedia journalism students will learn this semester

Teaching Temple University journalism students again

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It’s been three full years since I taught journalism at Temple University, but I’m back in the swing of things. This semester, I’ve got two full sections of seniors in various stages of boredom and panic.

We’ll be working on multimedia storytelling — telling complete, visually appealing news stories and publishing them to websites students will make for themselves. Continue reading Teaching Temple University journalism students again

A semester as an adjunct journalism professor

After teaching a month-long high school journalism course through Temple University, I was asked to stay on as an adjunct for the Fall 2010 semester in the journalism department. I was thrilled.

I spent the next 15 weeks teaching 13 students — mostly freshmen — about grammar and AP Style, and worked as a teaching assistant for Multimedia Urban Reporting Lab, Temple’s capstone journalism program, with which I have a partnership through my business, NEast Philly.

Aside from being excited about the new opportunity, I also looked forward to teaching two classes I’d taken as a student at Temple. Continue reading A semester as an adjunct journalism professor

My four weeks teaching Temple University High School Press


*The image above was designed by Jillian Bauer, my co-teacher.

I spent the last four weeks co-teaching Temple University High School Press, an intensive month-long summer journalism program.

The program unites students from the School District of Philadelphia with Temple University Department of Journalism’s extensive resources. I helped the 10 students write and edit stories, shoot photos, records videos and work on their interviewing skills. Continue reading My four weeks teaching Temple University High School Press